Thursday, December 18, 2008

December Fermentation Friday - Starting your Beer - Yeast!!

Hi all,

Sorry I missed last month but I am not really a picture taker. I am sure that will change next month with my first child but probably not. The wife will take care of that except for the ones with her in the picture. Well I am back and this months topic of starting your beer specifically dealing with our favorite microorganism yeast is a good one. I am always trying to decide what yeast I want to use and how I want to introduce it to my properly cooled wort. Before I start i would like to thank the guys at Rooftop Brew for hosting this months Fermentation Friday.

Well lets start out by saying what I have done. I have used dry, activator packs,propigator packs and white lab pitchable. For the last few batches I have been using all liquid yeasts. I am not really loyal to my yeast manufacturer so I just pick and choose depending on the day. I have brewed using a starter and not using a starter and since I am lazy it usually leans towards no starter. The starter starts the fermentation a few hours early but not that much faster. Also I usually forget to make a starter and then brew day arrives so I just pitch. So far so good.

I know its probably wrong and all you brewers out there might want to kick me out of the club but I think I like using dry yeast the best. I am a big pale ale (APA,IPA,DIPA,IIPA)guy and have made about 1/2 my beers in this style and I honestly can't really tell the effect of the yeast on an IPA between an american Ale yeast (WY1056,WLP060) and Safale 05 or Muntons. The biggest thing about it is the dry always start quicker wether I use a starter or not and its way easier and cheaper.

My next brew is going to be an ESB using the a liquid british ale yeast with a starter and then I am planning on throwing a really big IIPA (SG 1.095) on top of that yeast cake and wait for the explosion to happen in my dining room fermenation area. After that I think I am going to go back to dry yeast for my normal everyday ales like ambers, APA's, IPA's, etc and only use liquid yeasts when I want to so something very specific like a Belgian or a Hefeweizen. Other then that I feel I can get a great beer with dry yeast which in my honest opinion is just as good and saves me 5 bucks per batch. Lazy and cheap can you think of a better combination for a brewer!!!

Thanks again Rooftop Brew for hosting this months event and I am looking forward to reading about all the yeast adventures out there. See you next month!!

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